Issue 36 - March 2014

Research Trends Issue 36 - Research Assessment & Evaluation

The common theme of this issue of Research Trends is Research Assessment and Evaluation. This issue’s contributions all illustrate that bibliometric or informetric indicators are useful tools in the assessment of research, and in some cases how new metrics are being explored.

In the opening article Gali Halevi and I provide an overview of the various quantitative approaches to research assessment that are currently in use, which is followed by a number of contributions that focus on research assessment and evaluation from different angles. Sander van Servellen and Ikuko Oba, for example, present a study on a particular research field: stem cell research, while Gali Halevi interviews Dr. Daphne Getz on the way national research evaluation is carried out in Israel, by the Samuel Neaman Institute.

In their piece, Andrew Plume and Judith Kamalski discuss how new research methods using download data can be used in national research assessment in an international context. In another article on new research methods, Mike Taylor and Andrew Plume explore the potentials of “altmetrics”. They show that developing a good new metric is a complex process that involves the collection of accurate data, definition of a statistically sound metric, thorough validation, and a close interaction with users.

Finally, February 28th is Rare Disease Day, an international advocacy day to help raise awareness for rare diseases. In honour of this day, Iris Kisjes used SciVal to examine publication trends in the field of rare disease management.

We hope you enjoy reading this issue. Please share your thoughts and feedback with us! You can do this in the comments section following each article on our website or by sending us an email (researchtrends@elsevier.com). We look forward to hearing from you!

Kind regards,

Dr. Henk F. Moed

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Issue 35 - December 2013

Research Trends Issue 35: Developing Research in Developing Countries

This issue contains five articles that provide a bibliometric view of scientifically developing countries from different angles. First, Sarah Huggett reveals how these countries are scientifically maturing, while Ylann Schlemm discusses how the availability of scientific literature has a positive effect on this development. Gali Halevi shows how developing countries participate in international research networks and in a second piece, how approaches originating from them have had and still have a great impact on modern science. Finally Daphne van Weijen explains how authors from developing countries may overcome language obstacles to publication.

From a bibliometric point of view, the pieces illustrate the potential usefulness of publication trend analysis for the identification of emerging scientific institutions, of co-authorship relationships for the study of international collaboration networks, and of keyword analysis in large publication databases to identify cognitive influences from one field upon the other.

This issue also contains a sixth article, by Mike Taylor, on the development and use of new types of metrics denoted as altmetrics, an entity which is fast maturing into a new scientific (sub) discipline. This discussion paper is a prelude for a special issue of Research Trends dedicated to this topic next year.

We hope you enjoy reading this issue. Please share your thoughts and feedback with us! You can do this in the comments section following each article on our website or by sending us an email (researchtrends@elsevier.com).

Kind regards,

Dr. Henk F. Moed

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Issue 34 - September 2013

Editorial: Topics in Medical and Health Research

The rich variety of topics addressed in this RT issue reflects the enormous societal relevance of medical and health research: the historical influence of the military domain and the emergence of new, disease-related research topics; its funding and assessment; the role of scientific misconduct and medical misinformation; and the participation of its practitioners on Twitter. It sketches problems but also suggests solutions. And it clearly illustrates the usefulness of quantitative, bibliometric data and indicators, not only within medical and health research itself, but also in the science of medical and health sciences. It seems almost impossible to selectively present a few highlights from the pieces, but perhaps one issue deserves to be underlined here. Our interesting piece on scientific misconduct proposes as an antidote that when researchers suspect fraud by colleagues, they should be able to openly voice their concerns. This relates most of all to the crucial importance of open, collegial working relationships inside research teams and institutions as a remedy against scientific fraud.

We hope you enjoy reading this issue. Please share your thoughts and feedback with us! You can do this in the comments section following each article on our website or by sending us an email (researchtrends@elsevier.com).

Kind regards,

Dr. Henk F. Moed

Read this issue



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