The environment in which we live is impacted by everything that we put into and take out of it. And of course we do not exist in it alone; the other species both on land and in our seas have an important role to play. Research Trends interviewed three experts in the fields of biodiversity, waste management and oceanography to find out their points of view on environmental management.

Click on one of the interviews below to find out more.

Biodiversity and ecosystems: Professor Michel Loreau

Prof. Michel Loreau is Canada Research Chair in Theoretical Ecology at McGill University in Montreal. He has published 128 papers that have been collectively cited 7,079 times. His h-index is 33 – which means that 33 of his papers have been cited 33 times or more. His most cited paper, “Ecology: Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: Current knowledge and future challenges”, published in Science in 2001, has received more than 850 citations. Sixteen of his papers have been cited 100 times or more, and only 11 remain uncited to date.

Recycling waste: Dr Hans van der Sloot

Dr Hans van der Sloot is Associate Editor of Waste Management. He recently retired from the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands and now works as a private consultant. He has published 89 papers that have been collectively cited 1,131 times; his h-index is 16 – which means that 16 of his papers have been cited 16 times or more. His most cited paper, “An integrated framework for evaluating leaching in waste management and utilization of secondary materials”, published in Environmental Engineering Science in 2002, has received more than 90 citations. Six of his papers have been cited 50 times or more, and only two remain uncited to date.

Oceanic issues: Professor Edward Durbin

Edward Durbin is Professor of Oceanography working with Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC). He has published 63 papers that have been collectively cited 1,357 times; his h-index is 17 – which means that 17 of his papers have been cited 17 times or more. His most cited paper, “Growth and development rates of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus reared in the laboratory”, published in Marine Ecology Progress Series in 2001, has received more than 134 citations. Seven of his papers have been cited 50 times or more, and only 21 remain uncited to date.

Source for bibliometric data: Scopus

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